Sunday, July 16, 2017

ANNUAL TRADITION






I read an interesting blog post here by Margaret Powling about her annual tradition of re-reading a book which she first read as a young girl and which had a great impact on her.  In some ways, the books that touch us significantly tell a great deal about ourselves and even as we get older and change, re-reading a treasured novel can provide us a hint of the person we were that we had almost forgotten.

That's a gift.

This practise isn't something I have done myself but it makes we wish I had.   Ms. Powling kept the book, originally filched from the local library, for over 60 years.    You would have to own the book as most library books could not survive sixty years of wear and tear not to mention frequent necessary culls that libraries engage in.

The post is fascinating to read because Ms. Powling eventually met and interviewed the author, the well known Rosamunde Pilcher and she signed the tattered novel which, being of the author's earliest writings was never re-printed.   Having lived in the area where the novel, entitled April, was set made it all the more poignant.

I have enjoyed re-reading books that I have enjoyed in the past.  For example, see here. Sometimes, there is nostalgia and the recall of an age and stage where a genre or plot of a book was particularly meaningful, other times the location is one that I visited or lived in and hearing those familiar names mentioned and framed in the story's setting adds personal involvement.

It is likely better than re-watching an old movie or television show as you come to realize how stilted the acting was or how unrealistic the sets.   I was shocked when I realized that the Ponderosa home on Bonanza was a set with painted backdrops.  We must have been easily distracted by the action.   Although I was recently told that real fires are no longer used in movies and television programs since it can all be added after filming by means of CGI (computer generated imagery)   For safety reasons I will have to let that pass.

2 comments:

  1. I recently re-read Where the Red Fern Grows. We were "forced" to read it in fourth grade English class, but I didn't remember much about it. WOW WHAT A GOOD BOOK! No wonder I didn't remember much about it. I wasn't mature enough, and I didn't have enough life experience to understand what all was going on. Darn good book.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I was a learning support teacher and this novel was often assigned to classes I worked with. Similarly to 'Owls in the Family' I couldn't help but think how different the lives of children were then and the freedom they had to roam around. In 'Where the Red Fern Grows' I always ended up feeling sorry for the raccoons.

    ReplyDelete